Bianca Garner

MCB Welcomes Rosetta Rhine and Bianca Garner

Rosetta Rhine became the operations manager of the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences (MCB) in September 2020. Previously, she served as the program support manager in the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS).

What is your educational background?

I’m currently a student at the University of Maryland Global Campus pursuing a Master of Science degree in human resources management, expecting to graduate next month.   

What were you doing before you came to NSF? 

This is my 32nd year of federal service. I worked for the Department of the Navy and the National Institutes of Health before arriving at NSF 11 years ago.

What was your first impression of NSF? Has this impression changed since you began? 

My first impression of NSF was about how collaborative the environment was ; I had never worked in an organization where all levels interacted so much, where everyone seemed to have a seat at the table. The impression is still the same. There is a true learning culture in BIO, and the agency does a lot to support employee development. 

What are some of the challenges you have faced so far?

Getting acclimated to a new position in a virtual world. It helps that I’m not new to BIO, but I definitely would prefer to be onsite with the entire team.

Bianca Garner joined MCB as a program director in the Systems and Synthetic Biology cluster in October 2020.

What is your educational background?

I received a BS degree in chemistry from Xavier University of Louisiana, a MS degree in microbiology from the University of South Florida, and a PhD in microbiology from the University of Mississippi Medical Center. I have postgraduate training in infectious diseases, translational research, and higher education leadership.

What were you doing before you came to NSF?

I am a full professor of biology at Tougaloo College. A small liberal arts HBCU in Mississippi, Tougaloo has produced a large percentage of the medical doctors and teachers in Mississippi. As a biology professor, I teach numerous classes, including biochemistry, genetics, and microbiology. I serve as the pre-medical advisor for the early identification programs with Brown University, Boston University, University of Buffalo, and Mississippi State University. I have the pleasure of working with some incredible Hispanic and African-American students, many of whom enter into the STEM workforce. In addition, I serve as the principal investigator of the institution’s Career Pathways grant from the United Negro College Fund. This grant works to address the underemployment of students by ensuring career readiness is integrated into the liberal arts curriculum. Finally, I have an undergraduate research laboratory that examines microbial physiology in response to environmental conditions.

What are some of the challenges you have faced so far?

I began work during the pandemic, so onboarding has been virtual. This process has actually been very efficient, and I am very comfortable with the technological tools used by NSF. I do, however, consider connectivity to be one of the great mysteries of life, as you never know when you will be dropped from Zoom.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about serving as a program director at NSF?

Working at NSF is an incredible opportunity. You will gain insight into scientific and workforce advancement from a national perspective. I encourage individuals to review the NSF website and reach out to program directors to learn more about the various directorates within the agency. In addition, I direct interested individuals to the NSF Beta website for employment opportunities. I have several colleagues who are being reviewed for program director positions using this process and I wish them the best of luck!

When friends or colleagues find out that you work at NSF, what do they say or ask?

The most common question that I receive is always, do I like working for the Federal Government? I tell everyone, emphatically, yes! I enjoy the collaborative nature, the procedures used to ensure a fair and effective system, and the comradery that creates a good working environment.